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Marine habitat data product: Habitats Directive Annex I marine habitats

One of the main reasons for creating these composite products is to help assess the conservation status of the features listed for protected under the Habitats Directive. They are created in close collaboration between all the UK’s country nature conservation bodies.

Data product summary

 

1110 Sandbanks which are slightly covered by seawater all of the time

1170 Reefs

1180 Submarine structures made by leaking gases

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On the JNCC MPA Interactive Map (clipped to SACs beyond 12 nm from the coast)

On the JNCC MPA Interactive Map (clipped to SACs beyond 12 nm from the coast)

On the JNCC MPA Interactive Map (clipped to SACs beyond 12 nm from the coast)

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Web services UK habitat data products web service (coming soon) UK habitat data products web service (coming soon) UK habitat data products web service (coming soon)
Metadata On data.gov.uk (clipped to waters beyond 12 nm from coast)

On data.gov.uk (clipped to waters beyond 12 nm from coast)

Coming soon

Version history

2019 v3 (coming soon)

2016 v2

2012 v1

2019 v8 (coming soon)

 
Further information

Methods report (coming soon)

Habitat status in the UK

Methods report (coming soon)

Habitat status in the UK

Methods report (coming soon)

Habitat status in the UK

 

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1110 Sandbanks which are slightly covered by seawater all of the time

This composite product should be treated as a guide rather than the definitive extent and distribution of the habitat as sandbank boundaries are difficult to delineate and boundaries do not reflect the fact that sandbank complexes may also include the areas between and around the raised banks. The polygons are classified as either ‘area’ or ‘range’ of sandbank habitat.

The ‘area’ polygons have been produced using depth and slope information in combination with sediment data to identify independent sandy elevations from the seabed. These were added to sandy areas associated with eel grass/maerl beds identified before 2007.

The ‘range’ polygons show areas of sandy sediment in less than 60 metres water depth that are connected to areas of sandy sediment in less than 20 metres water depth. This is to give an indication of the possible total range of UK sandbanks (the 60 m limit is equivalent to the deepest site contour (found at Dogger Bank SAC) and was previously set at 50 m).

The actual extent of sandbanks in the UK is likely to be somewhere between that estimated from the ‘area’ and ‘range’ datasets. The ‘range’ polygons give an over-estimate as they do not exclude flat and gently sloping sand; the ‘area’ polygons may be an under-estimate as they are based on current best-available evidence that includes modelled data with lower confidence. As more detailed data is collated at the site level new methods suited to the individual sites may be used to improve the layers.

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1170 Reefs

This composite product shows areas of potential Annex I reef in UK waters. It uses data from multiple sources and consists of polygons – to allow calculations of extent – and points – to show a fuller picture of the distribution. These are areas where the statutory nature conservation bodies believe, from the best available evidence, that Annex I reef might be or is known to be present. Polygons and points are classified as ‘bedrock’, ‘stony’ and/or ‘biogenic’ reef.

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1180 Submarine structures made by leaking gases

This composite product shows the location of known Annex I submarine structures made by leaking gases, in the form of polygons, lines and points. There are currently only five known locations of submarine structures made by leaking gases in the UK.

The product also displays ‘fluid seep’ areas where gases are known to seep up from below the seabed.  Methane gas seepage from the seafloor mixing with seawater can react under certain conditions to form carbonate rock, therefore the range of this known fluid seepage can be used as an indicator for where there may be other, as yet undiscovered, occurrences of submarine structures made by leaking gases in the UK. These areas are classified as the ‘range’ of submarine structure habitat.

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Categories:

Marine Habitat Mapping

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