Skip to Content

SACs with marine components

Special Areas of Conservation (SAC) are designated to protect habitats and species listed on Annex I and Annex II of the European Habitats Directive.

SACs with ‘marine components’ protect Habitats Directive (2009/147/EC) Annex I habitats and/or Annex II species associated with the marine environment. Marine component habitats range from coastal, intertidal habitats such as coastal lagoons and mudflats and sandflats, to subtidal and deep-sea habitats such as reefs. There are currently 115 SACs with marine components covering approximately 14% of UK waters. SACs with marine components are displayed on JNCC's MPA mapper, and a list of these sites, the habitats and species they protect, and the site boundaries, is available on JNCC's Resource Hub.

JNCC's role

In the offshore marine environment, SACs afford protection to Annex I Submarine structures made by leaking gases, Reefs and Sandbanks which are slightly covered by sea water all the time; and Annex II Harbour porpoise.

JNCC is responsible for identifying and recommending SACs in the UK offshore marine area, which are designated under UK law through the Conservation of Offshore Marine Habitats and Species Regulations 2017. This includes waters beyond 12 nautical miles, within the Exclusive Economic Zone and the seabed within the UK Extended Continental Shelf claim. For areas within the UK Extended Continental Shelf claim but beyond the Exclusive Economic Zone, JNCC can recommend SACs for habitat features associated with the seabed only.

There are currently 115 SACs with marine components in the UK, of which twenty-five fall partly or wholly within UK offshore waters. Collectively, SACs with marine components cover approximately 14% of the UK marine area. An overview of the SACs that fall partly or wholly in UK offshore waters are provided in the table below, with links to further information on individual sites and their protected features included.

Site name

Protected feature(s)

Anton Dohrn Seamount SAC

1170 Reefs

Bassurelle Sandbank SAC

1110 Sandbanks which are slightly covered by seawater all the time

Braemar Pockmarks SAC

1180 Submarine structures made by leaking gases

Bristol Channel Approaches SAC

Harbour porpoise

Croker Carbonate Slabs SAC

1180 Submarine structures made by leaking gases

Darwin Mounds SAC

1170 Reefs

Dogger Bank SAC

1110 Sandbanks which are slightly covered by seawater all the time

East Rockall Bank SAC

1170 Reefs

Haig Fras SAC

1170 Reefs

Haisborough, Hammond and Winterton SAC

1110 Sandbanks which are slightly covered by seawater all the time

Hatton Bank cSAC

1170 Reefs

Inner Dowsing, Race Bank and North Ridge SAC

1110 Sandbanks which are slightly covered by seawater all the time

North Anglesey Marine SAC

Harbour porpoise

North Channel SAC

Harbour porpoise

North Norfolk Sandbanks and Saturn Reef SAC

1110 Sandbanks which are slightly covered by seawater all the time and 1170 Reefs

North-West Rockall Bank SAC

1170 Reefs

Pisces Reef Complex SAC

1170 Reefs

Pobie Bank Reef SAC

1170 Reefs

Scanner Pockmark SAC

1180 Submarine structures made by leaking gases

Solan Bank Reef SAC

1170 Reefs

Southern North Sea SAC

Harbour porpoise

Stanton Banks SAC

1170 Reefs

West Wales Marine SAC

Harbour porpoise

Wight-Barfleur Reef SAC

1170 Reefs

Wyville-Thomson Ridge SAC

1170 Reefs

Top

Designation process

Marine SACs are identified and recommended on the basis of the selection criteria contained within the Habitats Directive Annex III, and EC Guidance on implementation of the Natura 2000 network in the marine environment.

Once Areas of Search are identified using these criteria, the boundary is delineated following JNCC’s SAC boundary guidance. At this point sites are recommended to UK Government as draft SACs. Once approved for public consultation a site becomes a possible SAC (pSAC). After consultation if a site is approved by UK Ministers to be submitted to the European Commission it is at this point it becomes a candidate SAC (cSAC). The Commission then reviews the site and decides whether it should receive Site of Community Importance status. Once a site receives this status, UK Government has 6 years to formally designate as an SAC with conservation measures established. More detail on the various stages in the offshore SAC designation process is available on JNCC's Resource Hub.

Top

Management of offshore SACs

Management measures may be required in order to restore or maintain the conservation status of the protected features of SACs.

The Marine Management Organisation and Marine Scotland (in Scottish waters) are the lead authority regarding the implementation of, and compliance with, any measures implemented for the management of fishing activity.

Licensable activities such as oil and gas exploration within SACs have to comply with the Conservation of Offshore Marine Habitats and Species Regulations 2017. JNCC's conservation advice supports the consents process by setting out the conservation objectives for the protected feature of this MPA and advice on activities that may result in pressures to which the protected feature is considered sensitive.

Information on the wider SAC network can be found on the SAC webpages.

Top

Categories:

About Marine Protected Areas

Published: .

Back to top